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Customer FAQs

HydroOptix vs. Flat Masks

Divers with 20/20 vision

Contact lenses

Divers with prescription needs

Basic Optics

Non-optical features

Prevent fogging, leaking and troubleshooting other issues

SAFETY -- tempered glass vs. Polycarbonate


HydroOptix vs. Flat Masks

1. Q I thought the magnification from a flat mask helps me see better?
2. Q Why does a flat mask make things look fuzzy around the edge?
3. Q You claim the view through a conventional flat mask is so bad... are there independent metrics you can use for comparison with the HydroOptix view?
4. Q Are there military specifications to limit optical distortions?
5. Q How does the military measure optical resolution?
6. Q Aren't there other true size or panoramic masks?
7. Q The MEGA 4.5DD mask is a moderate-volume mask, but aren't low volume masks better?
8. Q Are you going to make a color correcting mask with pink / orange lenses?
9. Q How well does the Double-Dome lens work with camera housings?

Divers with 20/20 vision

10. Q I've got 20/20 vision. Can I use the Double-Dome masks?
11. Q I'm a 20/20 diver; do I have to see an eye doctor before I purchase a mask?
12. Q It sounds like contact lenses are a big hassle... is it really worth the effort & cost?
13. Q I've great vision! Why must I wear contact lenses?
14. Q I'm in my 50's; I don't wear contact lenses, only reading glasses. Can I use the Double-Dome masks?
15. Q Do you have any other solutions that don't require contact lenses?
16. Q If I wear contacts for underwater vision, how will I see above water? Won't I be "blind" above water? What will I do between dives?
17. Q If I'm 20/20 and don't want to use contact lenses, can't I just put eyeglasses inside the Double-Dome Mask?

Contact lenses

18. Q How safe are contact lenses?
19. Q Can I use one-day disposable contact lenses?
20. Q Can I use extended-wear contact lenses?
21. Q Which contact lenses are right for me?

Divers with prescription needs

22. Q I'm confused about the difference between Nearsighted and Farsighted (called Shortsighted and Longsighted in the U.K.).
23. Q Do the Double-Dome masks include corrective lenses for nearsighted divers?
24. Q I am nearsighted. Do I have to see my Eye Care Professional in order to purchase a mask?
25. Q I don't wear contact lenses; I wear glasses (nearsighted with astigmatism and reading). Can I use the MEGA 4.5DD mask?
26. Q I'm in my 50's; I don't wear contact lenses, only reading glasses. Can I use the Double-Dome masks?
27. Q I already have an eye doctor. Do I have to see one of the members of your DEC-Pro Network (Diving Eye Care Professionals)?
28. Q If the Double-Dome masks correct my nearsighted vision underwater, but has no optical power above water; won't I have fuzzy vision above water?
29. Q How can the Double-Dome Lens act as a universal lens for a range of nearsighted divers?
30. Q How can I know for sure if I won't need contact lenses for the Double-Dome masks?
31. Q The maximum correction possible with your Double-Dome masks is less than I need. Am I out of luck?
32. Q My left eye prescription is slightly stronger than my right eye, but both of them are still within the NAKED-EYE-RANGE. If I wear this mask how will the difference in "prescription" affect my vision? I'm thinking that my brain will adapt. What do you think?
33. Q What do I do if my eye doctor doesn't understand the idea?
34. Q I wear reading glasses. What do I do?
35. Q Can you correct for astigmatism?
36. Q Does it matter how far apart my eyes are?

Basic Optics

37. Q How does the Double-Dome work?
38. Q I'm confused about the difference between Nearsighted and Farsighted (called Shortsighted and Longsighted in the U.K.).
39. Q Which has a wider field-of-view, the Double-Dome or the MAX?
40. Q Does it matter how far apart my eyes are?
41. Q What is the MEGA 4.5 CoverLens™ for?
42. Q How does the MAX work?
43. Q I dive with the MEGA 4.5DD mask. Monocle or the CoverLens™? Which is most appropriate for me?
44. Q Aren't plastic optics inferior to glass?

Non-optical features

45. Q What colors are available?
46. Q Will it be available with a clear silicone face seal (skirt)?
47. Q If the silicone face seal (skirt) skirt tears or wears out over time, is it replaceable?
48. Q Is the Contact Lens Program ONLY for those with 20/20 vision?
49. Q Why double purge valves? Many "old school" divers regard them as unnecessary and a potential failure point.
50. Q One face seal (skirt) can't fit everyone?

Prevent fogging, leaking and troubleshooting other issues

51. Q Leaking: A little bit of water seems to be leaking into my mask, how do I tell what the problem is?
52. Q Leaking: The purge valves seem to let water trickle into the mask, how do I stop this?
53. Q How do I replace a purge valve?
54. Q Fogging: How do I prevent lens fogging?
55. Q What's the right way to clean the lenses?
56. Q Don't plastic lenses easily scratch?


SAFETY -- tempered glass vs. Polycarbonate
57. Q Which material makes a safer lens?

HydroOptix vs. Flat Masks

1. Q I thought the magnification from a flat mask helps me see better?
A Not really
When using a conventional flat mask you only see a truly sharp image in your central 7-degree cone-of-vision when your eyes look exactly straight ahead (perpendicular) through the lens of the mask. The further off-axis you look (i.e. at an angle to the lens), the fuzzier the image, because the light rays are bent (refracted). This phenomenon is really obvious in a clear swimming pool, but even in 6-foot visibility, everything looks sharper through a HydroOptix Double-Dome lens. (top)

2. Q Why does a flat mask make things look fuzzy around the edge?
A When looking through a flat mask, refraction makes everything look fuzzy at the edges -- shown here. In fact, your overall vision through a flat mask, in the clearest water possible, is 10 times blurrier than MilSpec requirements for dust goggles. By contrast, HydroOptix Double-Dome masks deliver razor-sharp vision, no matter which direction you look -- the off axis view is over 100-times sharper vs. a flat mask (10X better than MilSpec minimum requirement). (top)

3. Q You claim the view through a conventional flat mask is so bad... are there independent metrics you can use for comparison with the HydroOptix view?
A Thank you for asking!
First, if your in-air vision were so narrowed as it is while underwater using a flat conventional mask, you'd be qualified for disability, and laws would prevent you from obtaining a driver's license in North America or Europe.
Second, the U.S. Military demands clear viewing through gas masks, dust goggles, pilot's helmet visors, etc. The military sets specifications (MilSpec) that manufacturers must obey. Underwater, we perform 10 times better than MilSpec for in-air pilot visors, while conventional flat masks underwater are 10 time worse! (top)

4. Q Are there military specifications to limit optical distortions?
A There are very rigid Military Specifications for in-air vision systems, but conventional flat masks distort 10 times worse than these requirements!
• Magnification -- objects look 25% closer and 34% bigger than reality.
• Lateral Chromatic Aberration -- when you look where your nose points, things are sharp. But the further off-axis you look, the fuzzier the view becomes.
• Pincushion Distortion -- off axis lines bow inward; all shapes are distorted, worst at the edges.
The next time you are in a swimming pool, observe the tiles through a conventional flat mask both on & off axis.

The Double-Dome masks vastly exceed(s) MilSpecs for optical resolution. (top)

5. Q How does the military measure optical resolution?
A The goal is to resolve tiny objects that occupy a small area of your total field-of-view. There are 360° in a circle, and 60 arc-minutes per each degree of arc. MilSpec requires aviation visors / dust goggles / gas masks to resolve 2 arc minutes or less. If you can resolve less than one arc-minute -- which means exceptional vision -- you are able to notice very tiny / distant objects that occupy a miniscule fraction of your total view (i.e. spotting a distant airplane). Off-axis, flat masks can only resolve objects that span 22.0 arc minutes of your view, while HydroOptix resolves an outstanding .016 arc minutes. HydroOptix resolves tiny details in the entire field-of-view 100 times better than flat masks... whether you're in 2' or 200' visibility, you'll see better than ever before. (top)

6. Q Aren't there other true size or panoramic masks?
A No, we're the world's first and only! For decades, mask companies ignored the refractive index of water. Wrap-around shapes -- like ski goggles -- have been tried, but the immutable laws of optics result in distortions like fun-house mirrors, which also cause large areas to be out-of-focus. HydroOptix believes some companies today are guilty of advertising that's simply not true; we have filed complaints with the Federal Trade Commission to stop these “Optical Delusions.”
Judging image quality through the mask in air is no indication of how it will perform underwater. The results you see underwater are caused by the shape of the water (not the mask) merged against the trapped-air, inside the mask.
Check out the thumbs-down tech review of Aqualung's Sphera™ Mask for scuba by the U.K.'s "Diver" Magazine (uses the same lenses as the Seal™ goggle).
HydroOptix is the only company to prove our claims: we have the ray-traced results, performed by our world-renowned optical engineers. (top)

7. Q The MEGA 4.5 DD mask is a moderate-volume mask, but aren't low volume masks better?
A Instructors who teach quickie dive courses give a bad wrap to higher volume masks, usually for three reasons, which we’ll explain in a moment. But even in the 21st century, 1970's-era three-window masks are still preferred by many US Coast Guard Rescue Divers who jump out of helicopters. Why? SAFETY: If you can't see them, you can't save them. Rescue Divers want the best field-of-view possible. Our MEGA 4.5DD has less internal volume than these traditional 3-window masks.
Kevin Costner in The Guardian
Real Coast Guard training:
6 out of 7 in this photo wear 3-window masks!
Zoom-click


Faster isn’t better
Most new recreational divers are rushed through "modern" training so quickly, they don't have time to develop "automatic" dive skills. Remember learning to ride a bike? It wasn't easy, but now you can ride a bike automatically.

Clearing a mask, and equalizing the internal pressure when changing depth, are two of the hardest skills for many new divers to learn to make automatic. It just takes repetition (think "wax-on, wax-off"). If you're learning to dive, take extra pool sessions and improve these skills -- your ocean dives will be more fun.
Three claims for low volume masks:
Wider View (Myth!):
Moving flat windows closer to your eyes, you will get a very slightly larger field-of-view in air, but surprisingly when underwater, the closer the flat glass is to your face, increases the angle of refraction resulting in objects being more magnified (and narrowing your view)! The very widest flat mask yields a small 71° of horizontal vision underwater; most flat masks deliver less than 65°. Look at underwater photos of divers wearing conventional flat masks; as they angle their head away from the camera, the surface of their mask turns into a mirror -- if you can’t see in, they can’t see out.
A related phenomenon -- when you are underwater looking up, you can only see sky through a 95.5° cone. At greater angles, the undersurface of the water acts like a mirror, reflecting back the bottom. Optical engineers call this T.I.R. (Total Internal Reflection).
Easier Clearing:
All things being equal, a low-volume flat mask is easier to clear than large-volume masks, because you're displacing less water. But HydroOptix has an even better solution: our patented Twin-Turbo™ Purge Valve system! The Twin-Turbo™ Purge Valves with its oversized purge-valves means you will get water out of your mask easier than any other mask in the world.
Deep breath-hold diving:
Gonzo freedivers prefer ultra low-volume masks; more air for their lungs rather than spent equalizing pressure on the inside of the mask to ambient water pressure. Is it worth gaining a few extra seconds of bottom time vs. enjoying almost 5X times wider view? That depends upon what you’re doing. Spearfishing and underwater hockey can benefit from the superior situational awareness and eye-hand coordination that only a Double-Dome mask can provide. But if you’re setting records for time down, stick with an ultra-low-volume flat mask for now (we’re working on something that should delight freedivers).

Snorkelers: please be aware of shallow water blackout. (top)

8. Q Are you going to make a color correcting mask with pink / orange lenses?
A Not yet. Amber and pink filters were first used 60 years ago on underwater cameras with color film to help restore color balance in shallow water -- but when you are deeper than 40 feet, that pink / orange filter behaves like a dark gray filter, making the image darker and blurry. That is because the warm wavelengths of light (similar to the color-filter) have been fully absorbed by the water above you, and that filter blocks the ambient blue light. "Blue-blockers" are great for sunglasses, not for diving!
In low illumination, two physiological events occur inside your eyes:
1. Your pupils dilate; just like widening the iris blades of a camera lens, your focus will not be as sharp.
2. Images are formed inside your eye -- on your retina -- where you have two kinds of imaging sensors. CONES provide color vision and high resolution, but your cones stop working in dim light. RODS are for dim light, but rods have poor resolution and cannot show color.
If you compare clear vs. tinted lenses at 40 feet, you will discover the image through the clear mask is more colorful, has higher contrast, and is sharper; the deeper you go the more obvious the difference gets.
For safety's sake, you would never drive a car at night while wearing sunglasses. Likewise, we think that wearing tinted lenses deeper than 50 feet is ill advised. (top)


9. Q How well does the Double-Dome lens work with camera housings?
Pro -- Double-Dome lens
1. Physically more relaxing: it's easier and faster to position your body… and less neck strain. With a flat mask, you pull the housing firmly against your mask, thereby "locking" your skull's relationship with the viewfinder. That means to frame a shot that is above, down, left, right, either your neck or your entire body must rotate, pointing your nose at your subject. With our Double-Dome masks, your shooting eye can rotate naturally in its socket, in a VERY wide cone (about 60°), and still see into the viewfinder. Try looking through a land-camera… you'll see what we mean!
2. Enhanced situational awareness: for wide-angle photography, this might mean spotting a subject you would have missed while experiencing "tunnel-vision" when wearing a conventional flat mask.
3. Improved eye-hand coordination: useful when manipulating double strobe arms, or juggling more than one housing.
Con -- Double-Dome
Eye -relief of the Double-Dome is greater than a low-volume flat mask; your eye will be about 1/4" to 1/2" further from the viewfinder. Image size will be what you get in air, without the magnification effect of water. Many cameras and housings work great with the Double-Dome mask; some are not ideal. To test your viewfinder, put your mask on while on dry land and look through your viewfinder. If you use a low volume mask, pull the viewfinder away from your face 1/4" to 1/2". Can you live with that?
The Future
There has been more progress in the last 5 years of digital photography than the last 80 years of photochemical photography. There is a huge advantage to confirming your shot seconds after you have released the "shutter," while you are still 80 feet down. Even pro-photographers have botched exposures, unaware until reviewing their beloved Kodachrome® weeks later. In less than 4 years, as resolution and contrast latitude continue to improve dramatically, mini-LCD screens will make eye-relief a non-issue, and digital will be the rule, not the exception. (top)


Divers with 20/20 vision

10. Q I've got 20/20 vision. Can I use the Double-Dome masks?
A Absolutely! Divers who do not fit the Naked-Eye-Range of our Double-Dome masks can use contact lenses to temporarily adjust their vision to match the range of our masks. To some this may sound crazy but we currently have over 700 divers doing just that. Not sure what type of contacts you would require, if you know your eye prescription simply check out our Rx Conversion Chart. If you do not know your prescription it would be best to have your eyes tested by your local Eye Care Professional. If you discover that you would require contact lenses to dive with our Double-Dome masks you can visit on of our DEC-Pro's (Diving Eye Care Professionals) who can fit you with the latest generation of super-comfortable disposable contact lenses. If there are no DEC-Pro’s in your area contact us and with your personal eye care professional’s contact info and we will call them and inform them of what they need to do let you dive with our mask.

Our optional S.I.-Kit (Surface Interval Kit) provides you with prescription eyewear between dives and a place to store everything you'll need:
1. Transparent Dry Box.
2. Mirror
3. Eyeglasses (choice of -4.5, or -3.0, 64mm PD)
4. Polarized clip-ons
5. Sports Retainer
Our negative diopter CoverLens™ snaps onto the MEGA 4.5DD mask, giving sharp above water vision for entering and exiting the water. Divers using the MEGA 3.5DD mask will have a monocle with wrist lanyard to have sharp vision above water. (top)

11. Q I'm a 20/20 diver; do I need to see an eye doctor before I purchase a mask?
A Not necessarily -- Many divers first arrange a demo of the mask with their local retailer where they compare the field-of-view with a traditional flat mask. Even though your vision will be out of focus (unless you are young) you will be able to experience how much larger the Double-Dome mask field-of-view is over a conventional flat mask. This A to B comparison helps divers become more motivated to overcome the initial awkwardness that ALL contact lens users have overcome. (top)

12. Q It sounds like contact lenses are a big hassle... is it really worth the effort & cost?
A Using contact lenses is a skill that must be learned. Your body has a natural blink reflex that exists to protect your eyes by preventing foreign debris (dust, sand, etc) from entering your eye. The first time many people use contact lenses it can take upwards of thirty minutes for each eye. This is because the body is not accustomed to wearing contacts and is trying to protect itself. But with practice inserting and removing contact lenses your body adjusts and it becomes easier and easier. Soon using contact lenses will be as common a task as checking your air gage before diving. Is it worth the effort? Check out our Who's Talking page and read the letters and emails that are sent to us by divers who have learned to wear contacts just to use our mask. (top)

13. Q I've great vision! Why must I wear contact lenses?
A Our Double-Dome lens allows divers to see almost 5x more underwater because of its unique shape. The domed lens is able to wrap around giving the diver a much-improved filed-of-view. Double-Dome divers see 170° horizontally and 90° vertically compared to a conventional flat mask that only sees 71° horizontally and approximately 50° vertically (depending on the mask). Having each eye centered in a dome eliminates the refraction that causes objects to appear 34% larger and 25% closer when using a flat mask.  But when the Double-Dome lens is submerged in water the water forms around the lens, and because the water has a higher index of refraction than air the water gets curved into a negative lens. In order for divers with perfect vision to see properly we must use contact lenses to adjust their vision to match the range of the mask. This is very easy to do. Our Rx Conversion Chart takes a divers age and eye prescription into consideration as acts as a good guide to show people what prescription of contacts lenses they will require to dive with the Double-Dome masks. (top)

14. Q I'm in my 50's; I don't wear contact lenses, only reading glasses. Can I use the Double-Dome masks?
A If you only wear reading glasses you will most likely require contact lenses to use the Double-Dome masks. Once you use the proper contact lenses to dive with the Double-Dome mask you will experience the Magic Bifocal Effect underwater. Underwater your eyes will focus close, like they did when you were in your 20's! No longer will you need bifocals underwater if the Rx strength of your bifocals or reading glasses is +2.0 or less.  If +2.25 or stronger, then the latest bifocal contacts or monovision will give you great close-focus ability. The new generation of disposable soft contacts work for a wide variety of vision needs, for folks well into their 80's. There are now affordable disposable contact lenses that will work great for your eyes and the Double-Dome masks. As we get older, it is a wise idea to have regular eye-health examinations anyway... the additional cost of getting fit for contact lenses is a small price to pay for a view that's priceless. (top)

15. Q Do you have any other solutions that don't require contact lenses?
A Please check out our Products Page for more information on HydroOptix products that do not require contact lenses. (top)

16. Q If I wear contacts for underwater vision, how will I see above water? Won't I be "blind" above water? What will I do between dives?
A While wearing the MEGA 4.5DD above-water, our CoverLens provides clear above-water vision. Our optional SI-Kit (Surface-Interval Kit) includes:
1. A pair of prescription eyeglasses.
2. Custom-matched polarized lenses,
3. Sports retainer.
4. Mirror,
5. Transparent Dry Box. (top)

17. Q If I'm 20/20 and don't want to use contact lenses, can't I just put eyeglasses inside the Double-Dome Mask?
A

We would love the solution to be that simple. A simple dome, submerged, creates a negative-power effect... which then requires complimentary positive-power optics to net "0" power (as explained in "How it Works"). We used the world's most powerful optical design software and a team of world-renowned optical gurus to analyze hundreds of different optical solutions (i.e. different shapes of lenses and all kinds of glass and optical polymers). The computer always "preferred" putting the positive-power "on" your eye. The optically superior solution is to wear positive-power contact lenses and become "temporarily" nearsighted.

In the optical design computer, trying to move the positive-power away from one's face, even by a few millimeters, created all sorts of optical distortions. Our goal was a simple shape that used simple optical materials... ah, if only life were so accommodating! We are rightly very proud of the design breakthrough we made with the MAX, however, the mask with the widest field-of-view and highest-resolution will always be the Double-Dome masks! Bigger isn't always better; more expensive isn't always better.

The result you would get with plus-powered eyeglasses inside a Double-Dome mask:

1. Images magnified almost as much as a flat mask.
2. Crummy resolution in the central field-of-view.
3. Awful resolution past 30 degrees from center.
4. Impossibly bad resolution in peripheral view area.
5. Terrible fogging; multiple air / optical surfaces multiply the problem. The MAX has sealed lens barrels to avoid fogging. But a sealed chamber must resist implosion; we have computer-designed the MAX barrels to withstand the industry-standard drop-ball impact test while under pressure at 450 Meters. We will not certify diving the MAX deeper than 75 Meters. (top)


Contact lenses

18. Q How safe are contact lenses?
A

If you are fit to dive you are fit to wear contact lenses. The risk of eye infection is infinitesimal when a few simple hygiene protocols are followed. If you have an existing eye infection or corneal damage (e.g. scratched/very red eyes) and you have an impaired immune system (e.g. fever) you should not use contacts due to the elevated risk of eye infection during this time – and you should not be diving.

Swimming with contact lenses does not raise the risk of eye infections. But keeping contacts in for many hours or days after swimming IS VERY RISKY. Double-Dome divers who wear "Diving Rx" contacts are highly motivated to remove their contacts after their last dive, to return to their normal vision. Timely removal of contacts virtually eliminates the bacteria found in water.

The cornea is remarkably robust and resistant to infection, but the risk to one's vision, if basic hygiene protocols are ignored, can be severe. These protocols are detailed by your eye care professional during your contact lens wear instruction. It is the individual diver's responsibility to carefully obey these guidelines for proper use and to preserve the health of your eyes.

The US Navy, DAN (Divers Alert Network), PADI and NAUI all certify contact lenses as safe for diving... as long as you discard them or disinfect them at the end of the day. Soft lenses have a great track record for not falling out during dives, unlike older hard lenses. The latest-generation of disposable contact lenses are so comfortable that many 20/20 divers don't feel anything in their eye -- most lenses are more than 50% water!

If you require contact lenses to dive with our Double-Dome masks and do not have a current eye care professional use our Zip-Code Locator to find a local DEC-Pro (Global Network of Diving Eye Care Professionals). Many of these Eye Care Professionals are scuba divers with decades of experience who understand the divers needs. (top)

19. Q Can I use one-day disposable contact lenses?
A Not only can you use them but they are recommended. See previous question, #18. (top)

20. Q Can I use extended-wear contact lenses?
A

Yes, but we don't recommend sleeping in them overnight; they should be removed and properly disinfected at the end of the diving day. For 20/20 divers, one-day disposable lenses are the most economical and convenient method.

Swimming with contact lenses does not raise the risk of eye infections. But keeping contacts in for many hours or days after swimming IS VERY RISKY. Double-Dome divers who wear "Diving Rx" contacts are highly motivated to remove their contacts after their last dive, to return to their normal vision. Timely removal of contacts virtually eliminates the bacteria found in water.

The cornea is remarkably robust and resistant to infection, but the risk to one’s vision, if basic hygiene protocols are ignored, can be severe. These protocols are detailed by your eye care professional during your contact lens wear instruction. It is the individual diver’s responsibility to carefully obey these guidelines for proper use and to preserve the health of your eyes. (top)

21. Q Which contact lenses are right for me?
A This is a question that only you and your eye care professional can answer together. To give your eyes maximum comfort, not just the diopter power is considered; lens diameter and base curve are also important. We have established our DEC-Pro Network (Global Network of Diving Eye Care Professionals) to ensure that each and every diver using the Double-Dome system is completely satisfied, and continues to enjoy razor-sharp underwater vision and almost 5X times the view! (top)


Divers with prescription needs

22. Q I'm confused about the difference between Nearsighted and Farsighted (called Shortsighted and Longsighted in the U.K.).
A Our Glossary is very extensive and should be able to find the answers to your questions there.
NEARsightedness: same as myopia (called SHORTSIGHTED in the U.K.); enhanced ability to see close objects, inability to focus on distant objects.
FARsightedness: same as hyperopia (called LONGSIGHTED in the U.K.); usually able to focus on distant objects, inability to focus on close objects. (top)

23. Q Do the Double-Dome masks include corrective lenses for nearsighted divers?
A No extra "glue-on" or replacement lenses are attached on the inside of the Double-Dome lens. The Double-Dome has zero optical power out of water, but when a Double-Dome mask is submerged, the water itself, curving around the domes, magically creates a negative diopter lens. Unlike all conventional Rx lenses that have specific diopter power, a Double-Dome mask corrects for a wide range of nearsighted prescriptions.

If you are not a Naked-Eye-Match, just use affordable disposable contact lenses to adjust your vision to match the Double-Dome optics.

You will need contact lenses if:
A. You are nearsighted, but outside the required accommodation range..
B. Farsighted.
C. 20/20 and more than about 22 years old (we all lose our ability to focus close as we age according to this chart). (top)

24. Q I am nearsighted. Do I have to see my Eye Care Professional in order to purchase a mask?
A Not necessarily. The MEGA 4.5DD works, without contact lenses, if your prescription is generally in the range of -2.5 to -5.0 diopter, and astigmatism less than ± 2.0. Please email us a copy of your prescription, along with your age - we will get back to you quickly. If you do not know your prescription, your Eye Care Professional should provide you that info free of charge. If you do not currently have an Eye Care Professional, may we recommend one of the members of our Global DEC-Pro Network (Diving Eye Care Professionals)? (top)

25. Q I don't wear contact lenses; I wear glasses (nearsighted with astigmatism and reading). Can I use the MEGA 4.5DD mask?
A

Depending on your prescription. If your prescription is within the Naked-Eye-Zone on the Rx Conversion Chart then you will not require contact lenses. If you are out side the range you will need contacts to bring your visions inside the range of the mask. The new generation of disposable soft contacts work for a wide variety of vision needs, for folks well into their 80's. There are now affordable disposable contact lenses for those of us who need bifocals. And disposable contacts to correct astigmatism (toric lenses). The odds are very good that you can be fit with latest-generation comfortable soft lenses, and you will be able to use our MEGA 4.5DD mask.

If you have less-than-favorable memories of the "old-style" hard contact lenses we're sure you'll have a much better experience with modern disposable/soft contact lenses.

For maximum comfort and your own enjoyment, we'd suggest you first try above-water vision contacts; we think you'll be delighted at your improved vision. Then it is easy for your Eye Care Professional to modify your prescription to match the optics of our MEGA 4.5DD mask.

If your current Eye Care Professional dispenses contact lenses and you want to remain with that provider, you can e-mail us his or her name / phone or e-mail and we'll contact them on your behalf and explain your needs to them; that saves you time.

If your current Eye Care Professional does not dispense contact lenses, we'll refer you to one of our DEC-Pro members.

Our DEC-Pro Network is growing daily... we'll refer you to the contact lens provider who's geographically closest and also an expert with:

1. The tremendous range of new-generation disposable soft contacts.
2. Your special needs as a scuba diver.
To help you decide on what you'll need just click here and follow the instructions. (top)

26. Q I'm in my 50's; I don't wear contact lenses, only reading glasses. Can I use the Double-Dome masks?
A If you only wear reading glasses you will most likely require contact lenses to use the Double-Dome mask. Once you use the proper contact lenses to use the Double-Dome mask you will experience the Magic Bifocal effect underwater. Your eyes will focus close, like they did when you were in your 20's! You will not need bifocals underwater if the Rx strength of your bifocals or reading glasses is +2.0 or less. If +2.25 or stronger, then the latest bifocal contacts or monovision will give you great close-focus ability. The new generation of disposable soft contacts work for a wide variety of vision needs, for folks well into their 80's. There are now affordable disposable contact lenses that will work great for your eyes and the Double-Dome masks. As we get older, it's a wise idea to have regular eye-health examinations anyway... the additional cost of getting fit for contact lenses is a small price to pay for a view that's priceless. (top)

27. Q I already have an eye doctor. Do I have to see one of the members of your DEC-Pro Network (Diving Eye Care Professionals)?
A No. If your Eye Care Professional is not a member of our DEC-Pro Network but you think he or she might be interested in joining, please send us his or her name and phone number, so we may explain your needs. Your Eye Care Professional will immediately understand the simple optical principal behind the Double-Dome System. Please download this 3-page PDF for your eye doctor. (top)

28. Q If the Double-Dome masks correct my nearsighted vision underwater, but has no optical power above water; won't I have fuzzy vision above water?
A Yes, you will have fuzzy vision above water, but we have two solutions:
1. Our Monocle comes with Double-Dome masks. It has a standard -4.5-diopter lens -- custom diopter power lenses are available through HydroOptix. The Monocle easily slip-locks around your wrist on a lanyard, so it's quickly available.
2. SCUBA DIVERS: our patented CoverLens™ comes standard with the MEGA -4.5DD mask and temporarily clips to the front of the mask, giving you sharp vision above water. After you enter the water, unclip the CoverLens from the front of the MEGA 4.5DD mask and stow it in the provided Stowing-Plate. During your safety-stop at the end of your dive, snap the CoverLens back onto the MEGA before surfacing.
The CoverLens comes standard with -4.5 diopter -- custom diopter power CoverLens inserts are available through HydroOptix.
Our optional SI-Kit (Surface Interval Kit) provides you with prescription eyewear and a place to store everything you'll need:
1. Transparent Dry Box
2. Mirror
3. A Pair of prescription eyeglasses
4. Custom-matched polarized clip-ons
5. Sports Retainer
4. Protective eyeglass case. (top)

29. Q How can the Double-Dome Lens act as a universal lens for a range of nearsighted divers?
A The prescription or strength of your eyeglass or contact lenses are determined by three things, the inside curve (R2), the outside curve (R1) and the thickness of the lens. Changing any one of these values changes the prescription of the lens. If the curves remain unchanged but the thickness is increased the lens become more powerful, if it is made thinner the lens becomes weaker. When using a Double-Dome lens mask the mask lens has zero optical power but once underwater the water forms around the lens and water has a higher index of refraction than air, the water gets curved into an optical lens.  Now the inside curve (R2) is where the water curves around the domed lens and the back of the lens (R1) changes depending where you are focusing. If you are looking at your dive buddy 30 ft. away you are looking through a 30ft. column of water. This creates a –4.5 diopter lens in the water and allows you to focus far away. If your buddy starts swimming towards you and the distance becomes less the power of the lens created in the water becomes weaker. When you look at your gauges, which may only be twelve inches away, you are looking through a very short column of water. This water lens is actually weaker than -4.5 diopters allowing your nearsighted vision (natural or a result of your Diving Rx Contact Lenses) to take over allowing you to see up close. Older divers love this "Magic Bifocal Effect" because the Double-Dome masks can correct up to a +2.00 reading prescription. This allows older divers to see distant and near objects the same way they could when they were in their 20's, no more bifocals glue in reading lenses. If your reading prescription is stronger than +2.00 you may require a mild monovision correction to accommodate for the remaining correction needed. (top)

30. Q How can I know for sure if I won't need contact lenses for the Double-Dome masks?
A The only way to know for sure that you will not need contact lenses to dive with our Double-Dome lens masks is to try it, if things are fuzzy you need contacts if you see clearly congratulations you are a Naked-Eye-Match. The next best way to see if you fit within the broad Rx range of our masks is to use our Rx Conversion Chart. To use this chart you should know your prescription for the most accurate results. Simply find your age groups along the far left side and the sphere value of our prescription along the very top. The corresponding cell will tell you if you are a Naked-Eye-Match or which prescription of contact lenses you require. (top)

31. Q The maximum correction possible with your Double-Dome masks is less than I need. Am I out of luck?
A We can make you happy... Check out our Rx Conversion Chart, find your age group along the left side and eye prescription along the top, the corresponding cell will tell you the contact lens prescription you require to dive with the mask. These contact lenses will make you slightly less nearsighted than you are naturally and once you dive with the mask underwater you will be fully corrected. (top)

32 Q My left eye prescription is slightly stronger than my right eye, buth both of them are within the NAKED-EYE-RANGE. If I wear this mask how will the difference in "prescription" affect my vision? I'm thinking that my brain will adapt. What do you think?
A You are correct! The human brain has incredible ability to compensate for differences in diopter strengths between your eyes. For years, Eye Care Professionals have prescribed Monovision for presbyopes (those who need reading glasses), that is the wearing of different strength contact lenses for each eye. One's dominant eye gets crisp distance vision, and the other eye sees near objects in-focus -- the brain learns to ignore the fuzzy image and "concentrate" on the in-focus image. As long as your "better" eye is within the accommodation range of the Double-Dome mask and the difference between your eyes is less than 1.0 diopter, you will see great with no adaptation period.
A 1.5 diopter or greater difference between your eyes takes some getting used to, and if you are not old enough to require reading glasses, you may prefer "balancing" with a single contact lens on your "better" eye. For wide differences, your Eye Care Professional will give you the answer best for you. (top)

33. Q What do I do if my eye doctor doesn't understand the idea?
A Please contact us by phone, fax or email. Have available your doctor's contact information available (i.e. name, phone and fax) so that we may contact him/her on your behalf.
HydroOptix
Phone: 1 (877) WIDE EYE... that's 1 (877) 943-3393
Fax: 1 (310) 459-5067
Email: CustomerService@HydroOptix.com (top)

34. Q I wear reading glasses. What do I do?
A If you only wear reading glasses you will most likely require contact lenses to use the Double-Dome mask. Once you use the proper contact lenses to use the Double-Dome mask you will experience the Magic Bifocal effect underwater. Your eyes will focus close, like they did when you were in your 20's! You will not need bifocals underwater if the Rx strength of your bifocals or reading glasses is +2.0 or less. If +2.25 or stronger, then the latest bifocal contacts or monovision will give you great close-focus ability. The new generation of disposable soft contacts work for a wide variety of vision needs, for folks well into their 80's. There are now affordable disposable contact lenses that will work great for your eyes and the Double-Dome masks. As we get older, it's a wise idea to have regular eye-health examinations anyway... the additional cost of getting fit for contact lenses is a small price to pay for a view that's priceless. (top)

35. Q Can you correct for astigmatism?
A Yes.
1. Strong Astigmatism: The Double-Dome mask itself does not correct for astigmatism, but your Eye Care Professional will prescribe toric contact lenses that correct both your astigmatism and adjust your eyesight perfectly to Double-Dome optics.
2. Mild Astigmatism: For astigmatism less than ± 2 diopter in strength, Eye Care Pros routinely prescribe a "Sphere Equivalent" prescription. These contact lenses have slightly stronger spherical correction than "normal," which provides good vision without the slightly more expensive toric lenses. This practice causes no eye strain; there are no long-term risks... just enjoy the view! (top)

36. Q Does it matter how far apart my eyes are?
A No. Eyeglass prescriptions have a PD number; that's the space between your pupils in millimeters (pupillary-distance). The Double-Dome design allows for "PD" variations, since the center of each dome lens is positioned further from your cornea than an eyeglass lens. Divers with narrow or wide-set eyes will experience no discomfort, since the angle of error is within established guidelines for eyeglasses. (top)


Basic Optics

37. Q How does the Double-Dome work?
A For decades dome-ports have been the de-facto standard used on world's best wide-angle underwater camera housings. We've adapted the same optical concept to human vision. Over the years, there has been lots of WRONG information published about the "virtual image" created by dome-ports. Please take 2 minutes at "How it Works;" our diagrams make this easy to understand. (top)

38. Q I'm confused about the difference between Nearsighted and Farsighted (called Shortsighted and Longsighted in the U.K.).
A Our Glossary is very extensive and should be able to find the answers to your questions there.

NEARsighted: same as myopia (called SHORTSIGHTED in the U.K.); enhanced ability to see close objects, inability to focus on distant objects.

FARsighted: same as hyperopia, (called LONGSIGHTED in the U.K.); usually able to focus on distant objects, inability to focus on close objects. (top)

39. Q Which has a wider field-of-view, the Double-Dome or the MAX?
A The Double-Dome masks have a wider field-of-view.
Double-Dome: 170° by 90°
MAX: 140° by 90° (top)

40. Q Does it matter how far apart my eyes are?
A No. Eyeglass prescriptions have a PD number; that's the space between your pupils in millimeters (pupillary-distance). The Double-Dome design allows for "PD" variations, since the center of each dome lens is positioned further from your cornea than an eyeglass lens. Divers with narrow or wide-set eyes will experience no discomfort, since the angle of error is within established guidelines for eyeglasses. (top)

41. Q What is the MEGA 4.5 CoverLens™ for?
A The negative diopter CoverLens™ provides razor-sharp above-water vision for naturally nearsighted divers and "temporarily" nearsighted divers (20/20 divers wearing positive-power contact lenses). (top)

42. Q How does the MAX work?
A Remember that the optically simpler Double-Dome matches a nearsighted diver's excess positive-diopter eyeball to the negative-diopter created when the mask is submerged. MAX, designed for 20/20 divers, is also based on dome-port optics, but the MAX is a nest of titanium-filled, high-index optical glass lens elements for each eye, sealed in a pressure-proof barrel. Instead of relying on a nearsighted cornea (+ power), the MAX puts a positive-power lens very close to the diver's face. An intermediate lens, which controls distortions, is trapped in the middle of the barrel. Capping the front of the pressure-barrel is the acrylic dome, which is protected from scratches by the CoverLens (replaceable if scratched). Looking through the MAX is like looking through binoculars in reverse (in air) - images look further and smaller than normal; underwater, proper size / distance is achieved.
The MAX is very big, and too expensive for the average scuba diver. Hundreds of optical alternatives were considered, but none could come close to matching the resolution and wide-view performance of the MAX design... except the Double-Dome -- which requires one to be nearsighted (or "temporarily" nearsighted with contact lenses). The small and lightweight Double-Dome provides an even more expansive field-of-view than the MAX (170º vs. 140º).
The U.S. Navy is interested in integrating our MAX optics into their full-face masks; We are entering into an R&D program with the Navy, that we hope the benefits will spin-off for tech and commercial divers. At this time we have postponed the development of MAX masks as a sport-diving product. (top)

43. Q I dive with the MEGA 4.5DD mask. Monocle or the CoverLens™? Which is most appropriate for me?
A

Our Monocle comes with all our Double-Dome masks. It has a standard -4.5-diopter lens -- custom diopter power lenses are available through HydroOptix. The Monocle easily slip-locks around your wrist on a lanyard, so it's quickly available. Our patented CoverLens™ comes standard with the MEGA 4.5DD mask and temporarily clips to the front of the mask, giving you sharp vision above water. After you enter the water, unclip the CoverLens from the front of the MEGA 4.5DD mask and stow it on the provided Stowing-Plate. During your safety-stop at the end of your dive, snap the CoverLens back onto the MEGA 4.5DD mask before surfacing.

The CoverLens comes standard with -4.5 diopter -- custom diopter power CoverLens inserts are available through HydroOptix. (top)

44. Q Aren't plastic optics inferior to glass?
A No. In the last 10 years, tremendous advancements in molding technology and optical polymers have achieved breakthrough products like DVD and low cost / high quality aspheric camera and projection lenses.
HydroOptix uses the highest quality optical-grade polycarbonate; only half the weight of glass, it's 5 times stronger -- bulletproof windows and CDs are made of polycarbonate!
If you are concerned about scratches to the lens, we have thet answers here. (#55) (top)


Non-optical features

45. Q What colors are available?
A Frame colors for the MEGA 4.5DD Mask are shown here:
They are:
Crystal Blue
Crystal Clear
Crystal Yellow
Crystal Green
Crystal Pink
Tech Black
Tech Yellow
Tech High-Viz Yellow
(top)

46. Q Will it be available with a clear silicone face seal (skirt)?
A No. Clear silicone would cause very annoying reflections on the interior surface of the lenses. The HydroOptix field-of-view is so expansive, you will not feel boxed-in... just you and the fish!
The Double-Dome mask's opaque face-seal / skirt comes in either metallic-silver skirts or black, depending on frame color. We use superior grade, hypoallergenic silicone. (top)

47. Q If the silicone face seal (skirt) skirt tears or wears out over time, is it replaceable?
A Sort of. We use a superior grade of silicone, which will provide years of service if treated properly. In the event of damage, while the skirt is not replaceable, we offer a very generous replacement policy. Just turn-in your used Double-Dome and get a brand new Double-Dome at a terrific discount. (top)

48. Q Is the Contact Lens Program ONLY for those with 20/20 vision?
A No. Just about anyone -- regardless of vision -- can use the Double-Dome in conjunction with appropriate contact lenses. If your accommodation ability (minimum close-distance focusing) is outside the range of the Double-Dome mask, or you have strong astigmatism, your Eye Care Professional can select from the huge range of disposable contact lenses to find the type that is best for you. Practically everybody can enjoy this revolution in underwater vision. One of the members of our DEC-Pro Network (Global Network of Diving Eye Care Professionals) can answer questions that are unique to your needs. (top)

49. Q Why double purge valves? Many "old school" divers regard them as unnecessary and a potential failure point.
A Purge valves are actually very reliable... all regulators have purge valves in the second-stage, used when you exhale. In regulators, reliable purge valves have a big diameter, but all prior masks use small diameter purge valves.
Meanwhile, snorkel purge valves have proven themselves to be very reliable (yeah, we know... experienced freedivers do not use snorkels with purge valves). Our purge valves are the same ones used on snorkels that have been top-rated by Rodale's Scuba Diving Magazine.
Why does our mask have 2 purge valves? Both are necessary on our Double-Dome; when a small amount of water gets into a FLAT mask, the water flows down, out of your central field-of-view, into the lower corner. But with our twin concave-shaped lens, any water tends to puddle in your central field-of-view. (top)

50. Q One face seal (skirt) can't fit everyone?
A We offer multiple face skirts:

4.5DD mask skirt options

(top)


Prevent fogging, leaking and troubleshooting other issues

51. Q Leaking: little bit of water seems to be leaking into my mask, how do I tell what the problem is?
A On dry land, put about 4 tablespoons of water into the mask, and then put the mask on. Draw a slight vacuum (inhale through nose). To determine if the leak is due to a manufacture defect, or poor skirt fit, slowly rotate your head so the water flows over all the inside of the mask and surface. The sound of entering air or bubbles will show where the leak is. You may want to do this in front of a mirror or with a buddy, to help locate the precise spot.

If the leak appears to be coming from a particular spot on the skirt, try applying Chapstick on the skirt where the leak occurs. Repeat the same test to see if that fixes the leak. If the Chapstick works, you may want to try this hypoallergenic silicone mask seal (Chapstick can degrade your silicone face skirt over time). This works great for moustaches and deep laugh lines. (top)

52. Q Leaking: The purge valves seem to let water trickle into the mask, how do I stop this?
A The silicone material of the purge valves can feel "dry" to the touch in air if dried-on salt / chemical deposits reduce their "sticktion" on the hard plastic valve seat. This will allow the minor leaking as you describe.

SOLUTION:
A thin film of silicone grease rubbed into the silicone will restore effectiveness of the flappers. Make sure to use viscous grease from a tube, not aerosol, which will wash off too easily. Dive shops sell the grease for zippers on wetsuits / drysuit, and O-rings on camera housings. The stickiness (surface-tension) from the silicone grease helps prevent a flapper from opening when minor pressure changes might otherwise cause a "burp."

HOW TO GREASE A FLAPPER:

Use just a dot
of silicone grease.
DO NOT USE Vaseline,
it will destroy the silicone!
Rotate flapper to move
silicone around entire
perimeter of valve.
TIP:
When purging out water, your head must come completely upright so that every last drop of water flows downhill -- backwards towards the flapper valves. Otherwise a few drops will remain.  If water does remain, as soon as you resume head-down position... the water flows back into the dome lens area. (top)

53. Q How do I replace a purge valve?
A Many divers get hundreds of dives on their 4.5DD mask using the original silicone purge flapper valves (also called mushroom valves). If the silicone valves become damaged, this video shows how to install a fresh pair in less than 60-seconds:
54. Q Fogging: How do I prevent lens fogging?
A Our Double-Dome lenses are pretreated at the factory with our exclusive NanoFOG moisture absorbing membrane. When diving, the membrane absorbs humidity rather than letting tiny beads of water-vapor form on the inside of the lens. NanoFOG coating has been proven to work extremely well from the tropics to under the ice. However, the NanoFOG coating requires some special care:

DO NOT SCRUB THIS LENS PRIOR TO USE. At the factory our Double-Dome lens is Hard Coated on the outside to resist scratches, and NanoFOG coated on the inside. When tiny beads of moisture (fog) land on the inner lens surface, they are absorbed into the NanoFOG coating. The NanoFOG coating becomes soft in water -- handle carefully to prevent scratches on the inside of the lens.

Before diving: Splash in 1-Oz / 30-ml of DRINKING water, roll the mask around to let the water saturate all areas inside the lens, drain and go diving. Pre-dive saturation of the NanoFOG coating with DRINKING water prevents salts and minerals from degrading the effectiveness of the NanoFOG coating.

After diving: Do not leave the mask submerged in a rinse-bucket where other objects floating in the water could drift inside the mask and scratch the NanoFOG coating. Remove salt crystals and sand by dunking in FRESH water -- do not rub the soft NanoFOG coating to remove this debris, just flush with a gentle stream of FRESH water.

To dry: Prevent "bathtub rings" at the bottom of each dome by placing the mask silicone skirt down (domes-up).
To clean: If salt / brackish water or suntan lotion / body oils have dried on the membrane, this will reduce the anti-fog properties. NEVER use solvents or alcohol! ONLY use mild dish soap, "Dawn" brand works well (dilute 1:5 before sloshing into mask).
  1. Soak in drinking water for 5 minutes to help dissolve mineral deposits. Careful not to force a hard stream of water onto the lens surface.

  2. The McNett® SeaGold™ Anti-Fog Gel is helpful for cleaning the NanoFOG coating, but be sure to use only gentle finger pressure to massage the gel into the NanoFOG surface while adding a little drinking water to reduce friction; rinse.

    Careful -- long  fingernails and rings can scratch the inside of the lens / membrane.
For your next dive, pre-wet the mask with a few tablespoons of drinking water from your water bottle and apply a small dab of the anti-fog gel -- distribute gently with your bare finger. DO NOT do this while wearing a dive-glove (will scratch the membrane).

Lens Replacement Kits are available in case the old lens gets damaged. (top)

 
55. Q What's the right way to clean the lenses?
A Always rinse clean with fresh water, to flush out sand and avoid formation of salt crystals. If salt crystals form between dives, do not rub. Just dunk the mask in the fresh-water rinse tank and agitate to re-dissolve the salt before your next dive. Do not apply anti-fog gel on top of salt-crystals; first re-dissolve the salt.
Also review cleaning-tips, in number 53, above. (top)

56. Q Don't plastic lenses easily scratch?
A Commercial and military divers have used polycarbonate (PC, also known as Lexan®) on their full-face masks for decades, because safety is a top priority in challenging situations. PC is 20 times stronger than glass. While glass is indeed more scratch resistant than PC, our proprietary anti-abrasion coating, applied during lens manufacturing, will ensure clear vision for many years with proper care. Think about it... PC headlight covers must withstand abrasions from pebbles and road salts -- and we use the same coating.
Should a scratch occur- SURPRISE -- all but the deepest gouges on the outside of the mask are virtually invisible underwater. That is because the water that fills the scratch closely matches the refractive index of the polymer. (top)

SAFETY -- tempered glass vs. Polycarbonate

57. Q Which material makes a safer lens?
A Polycarbonate is MUCH safer than glass
The dive industry's safety standard for masks is woefully inferior to that required of $4 safety eyewear. Indeed most common plastic eyeglasses must meet higher standards!

Tempered glass is 5 times stronger than non-tempered glass. Glass has the advantage of resisting scratches because it is quite hard. But you can’t have it both ways -- tempered glass is hard but very brittle -- it breaks. ALL professional full-face masks and dive helmets use Polycarbonate (PC) lenses for increased diver safety.

All above-water safety eyewear is made from Polycarbonate because PC is more than 150 times stronger than tempered glass when measuring impact resistance. PC is “ductile” – it bends but does not break. Bullet-resistant eye guards are made from PC, the most impact-resistant of all polymers.

The test for high-impact safety eyewear (ANSI Z87.1-2003) --
A 1/4-inch diameter steel fired at up to 204 MPH, with no lens breakage allowed:

-- Spectacle lenses: 102 MPH (150 ft./sec.)
-- Goggles: 170 MPH (250 ft./sec.)
-- Faceshields: 204 MPH (300 ft./sec.)

In 1985, before excellent scratch-resistant coatings for PC were formulated for automotive headlights, the leading scuba equipment companies agreed among themselves -- for the first time -- to establish an industry-wide safety standard for dive masks. But the company representatives settled for a "voluntary standard" that does not have to be followed. This standard was published through the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Manufacturers put these stickers on some masks -- NOT ALL GLASS MASKS ACTUALLY PASS THESE STANDARDS, DESPITE WHAT THE STICKER SAYS --

-- This lens exceeds the impact test requirements of the
-- American National Standard Z86.11-1985. Impact resistant
-- lenses can break or shatter and cause injury to the user
-- if subjected to undue force or impact.

The "Z86.11-1985" dive mask test --
A 1-inch diameter steel ball dropped by gravity from 50-inches onto the lens, with no breakage of the lens.

However, NO mask with "fused-glass" corners (which didn't exist in 1985) passes "Z86" when the steel ball is dropped onto the “fused” corner. Glass shards are broken off the corners, leaving razor-sharp edges, which contradicts Z86.

Hard-coated PC lenses will scratch more easily vs. glass. But underwater, minor scratches are invisible as the refractive index of the PC lens and seawater are so close -- the water fills in the scratches, as it does for minor scratches on your plastic-faced gauges.

HydroOptix PC lenses are not made or tested to meet high-impact safety eyewear standards and should not be used as such. In fact we use a PC alloy that sacrifices some impact-protection to make our lenses more scratch-resistant. All that said, our lenses are 10-times more impact-resistant vs. any recreational glass dive mask. A few divers have told us how our PC lens saved them from potential tragedy -- and had a severely scratched / gouged Double-Dome lens to prove their story. Our PC lenses are replaceable. (top)


If you have a question not addressed in the website or in this FAQ section,
please email us. We will reply as soon as possible.

Thank you,
The HydroOptix Staff

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